Upcoming Events: 2018
SEASON III

April 18th, 2018.   10:00am - 2:00pm

FACE CAST LAB

Face Cast Lab
National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institute
April 18th, 2018.   10:00am - 2:00pm

Why and how did natural history museums create plaster casts of faces? ...

 

Why and how did natural history museums create plaster casts of faces? The NMNH Anthropology Department, in collaboration with the public art program Parkeology asks these questions through the Face Cast Lab. As an extension of our 2016 program Facing Artifacts, we will explore the technical processes behind how human faces were replicated and used for anthropological research in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Staged in Q?rius, The Coralyn W. Whitney Science Education Center, Face Cast Lab technicians will demonstrate on live models the step-by-step procedures of creating copies of the human face with alginate and plaster. The public and Smithsonian staff are invited to visit and witness this process unfold, and to participate in the Lab's ongoing research about how we are understood and remembered through artifacts. NMNH Physical Anthropologist Dave Hunt, Cultural Anthropologist Gwyneira Isaac, and Smithsonian Researcher Larry Taylor will also be on site, displaying and interpreting face casts created by the NMNH Anthropology department for the 1915 Panama California Exposition.

The Face Cast Lab runs April 18th from 10 am to 2 pm in the Q?rius Barbara and Craig Barrett Lab

 
 
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Face Cast Research

At the National Museum of Natural History
What started as a one day event at the San Diego Museum of Man has now extended into a multi-year project with anthropologists and researchers at the National Museum of Natural History and Osage and Kiowa communities.
...

 
 

What started as a one day event at the San Diego Museum of Man has now extended into a multi-year project with anthropologists and researchers at the National Museum of Natural History and Osage and Kiowa communities.

After producing the 2016 Parkeology project Facing Artifacts, which looked into the creation and display of hundreds of plaster life casts of Native Americans by 20th century physical anthropologist Ales Hrdlicka, we were left with many questions. The biggest question was if present day descendants of these face casts knew that replicas of their family members faces were in museum collections. We also wanted to know more about the research methods and theories that motivated the production of these face casts.

Through a twist of fate, Gwyneira Isaac, Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History was in San Diego and attended Facing Artifacts. Not only did we get to meet her, we cast her face, and she joined as special guest on Channel Parkeology. An affinity was struck, and we started to work together.

When visiting Gwyn at the National Anthropological Archives in May 2017, another serendipitous moment occurred: we met Larry Taylor. Larry Taylor is an Oklahoma based Smithsonian Fellow working to reconnect Osage and Kiowa community members to their ancestors whose faces were cast by Smithsonian anthropologists. 14 years ago, Larry Taylor discovered that his wife’s Grandfather, Albert Penn, had been cast by Micka, an assistant of Hrdlicka. Since then, Larry has been doing the difficult detective work of identifying living family members of the face casts and busts from often incomplete collection information.

By working closely with collections manager and physical anthropologist Dave Hunt, replicas of the busts have been returned home to the Osage Nation Museum and the Kiowa Tribal Museum. For many families, they are seeing their ancestors face-to-face for the first time. As part of this ongoing project, we have begun to work with the Smithsonian oral history program Recovering Voices to interview ancestors about their relationships and memories to the face casts.

To Learn more about Larry Taylor’s research, please visit the Facebook Page: Native American Indian, Molds, Cast, Bust

 

 
 

January - May 2018

Anthro-pology, museums, and the body


Anthropology, Museums and the Body
Graduate Semester Course
National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institute

Our research about the social and historic complexities about the human body in museum collections now continues as a graduate level course.
...

 

Our research about the social and historic complexities about the human body in museum collections now continues as a graduate level course. Parkeology is co-leading Anthropology, Museums and the Body with National Museum of Natural History curator and anthropologist Gwyneira Isaac.  Alongside George Washington University Anthropology and Museum Studies students, we are visiting collections and archives throughout the Smithsonian institution in order to understand the different scientific and social outlooks that have lead to housing duplicates and fragments of the body.

This course raises many deep-rooted issues of race, culture, genetics, gender and power structures, so we are drawing from the expertise from medical science curators, forensic scientists, artists, archivists, anthropologists and community members to approach this material. As an interdisciplinary course, students are responding to the research through creating both research papers and art projects.

 
 
 
 
 
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Queen's Circle book


Queen’s Circle Book
After two years of conducting interviews with San Diego’s drag queens, dykes, madames, leather daddies, police officers...

 

After two years of conducting interviews with San Diego’s drag queens, dykes, madames, leather daddies, police officers, defense lawyers, health officials, adult actors, politicians, and park rangers about cruising culture in Balboa Park, we are now transforming Queen’s Circle stories into a book!

We are working closely with designer and artist Marina Grize to produce a text that sensitively transcribes the stories of the surveillance, management, and celebration of brick and mortar  LGBTQ hookup culture. We feel this project is important because though Queen’s Circle stories are rooted in Balboa Park, San Diego, they speak to larger social patterns of the joys and challenges of finding intimacy when it was illegal to be gay in the U.S.

This project is made possible with support from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation

 
 
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Recurring Events: 2016 - 2017
SEASON 1 & 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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queen's circle

Queen's Circle
Today, hookup apps coordinate relationships and casual sex. Yet some remember how restrooms, greenery, and parking lots aided the lost art of cruising...

 

Today, hookup apps coordinate relationships and casual sex. Yet some remember how restrooms, greenery, and parking lots aided the lost art of cruising.  Since the 50’s, Balboa Park has been a meeting place for San Diego's LGBTQ community.

Over two years, we interviewed dragqueens, dykes, madames, leather daddies, police officers, defense lawyers, health officials, adult actors, politicians, and park rangers about their relationship to the surveillance, management, and celebration of hookup culture in Balboa Park, San Diego, California. Many tales speak of a larger social patterns of the joys and challenges of finding intimacy when it was illegal to be gay in the U.S.

These stories are staged as a live audio installation called Queen’s Circle. In a large parking lot at the edge of Balboa Park (known by the initiated as “The Fruit Loop”) 20 parked unlocked cars play a different story on their sound system. In the dark of the night, visitors hop in and out of the cars, listening to tales of brushing shoulders with strangers while experiencing it in real time.

 
 
 
 
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QUEEN'S CIRCLE ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE: 
TODD MOELLENBERG

 

 

Performance artist, poet, and concert pianist Todd Moellenberg is our field correspondent for the month, as he takes his daily walk to Fruit Loop. He will be posting pictures and observations along the way to the Parkeology website and instagram feed.

 

 

Production
Kate Clark, Creative Director, interviewer and story editor
Walter Meyer, interview liaison
Angela Risi, story editor
Camille Laut, story editor
Marina Grize, Creative Advising + Marketing
Lissa Corona, table host
Diana Benavidez, lead production assistant
Alena Vasquez, project support
Jeremy Raab, project support
Ashley Moy, project support
Celia Gold, project support
Jeszi McPeak, project support
Peter Chen, project support
Rafa Ríos-Mathioudakis, photography
Todd Moellenberg, Parkeology Artist in Residence: Fruit Loop Correspondent
Nick Lesley, Technical Support
San Diego Art Institute, PR support
Parker Bray, equipment support
Ren Ebel, Channel Parkeology Video, Editing, Direction
Samuel Dunscombe, audio post production support


Lambda Archives Support
Walter Meyer, Office Manager
Ken Selnick, Digital Archivist
Steve Wroblewski, Lambda Board Member
and Oral History Interviewer
Jen LaBarbera, Head Archivist


Parks and Recreation Administration Support
Senior Park Ranger Ryan Robertson
Park Ranger Carina Weber
Park Ranger Kim Duclo
Senior Park Ranger Jon Anderson

Interviewees
Anonymous Charlie
Nicole Ramirez Murray, San Diego Human Relations Commission Chair
Bill West, Former Porn Actor/Masseur
Chris Shaw, Bar Owner
John Graham, Retired City of San Diego Police Officer
John Lockhart, Frontrunners marathon runner
Susan Jester, San Diego Sheriff’s LGBT Advisory Council Member
Kim Duclo, Park Ranger
Wendy Sue Biegeleisen, Lesbian Activist
Terry Cunningham, HIV Health Services Planning Council Chair
Oliver Cleary, San Diego Criminal Defense Lawyer
Carla Coshow, Hillcrest resident since 1975, Owner of The Flame lesbian bar
Big Mike, Bartender, Photographer, LGBT activist, and community fundraiser
Anonymous
Rick Ford, Adult Industry Entrepreneur
Charles David, A Letter to the People of San Diego, read by Walter Meyer
J Marcus Newman, Photographer
Erik Trayvon Benson, Event Planner
Giselle de la Rosa, Activist
Jim Hurtado, ESL teacher
Alberto R. Cortés, Mama’s Kitchen Executive Director
Todd Moellenberg, Fruit Loop Field Correspondent, Path Poem

Car Donors
Gabrielle Ramlow
Esther Valenzuela
Joseph Swift
Joe Yorty
Minxuan Lin
Kate Clark
Todd Moellenberg
Rafa Rios
Jeremy Raab
Ryan Hand
Lucas Spenser
Ren Ebel
Brian Schoner
Dr. Joel Trambley
Peter Chen
Jason Crane
Sarah Schwartz
Maria Rios- Mathioudakis
Ken Selnick
Angela Risi
Dominic Paul Miller
Alena Vasquez
Brianna Rigg
Nichole Special
Samuel Dunscombe
Todd Moellenberg
Ken Selnick
Melinda Guillen
Sara Solaimani
Seth Ferris
Stephanie Sherman
Lucas Spenser
Briana Schoner
Parker Bray
Ren Ebel

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THE NAKED TRUTH


The Naked Truth at Zoro Gardens, Balboa Park
For the two-year run of the California-Pacific International Exposition during 1935-36 at Balboa Park...

 
 

For the two-year run of the California-Pacific International Exposition during 1935-36 at Balboa Park, anyone could pay their 75 cents and spend as long as they wished watching up close fellow human beings hang out and move about stark naked. Nudist historians, of which there are apparently very few, feel this was the first, and only, nudist park open to the casual public.

Seventy years later, lots of San Diegans don't believe it actually happened. But it did, right there on the Prado, in Zoro Garden, a verdant glen especially designed for the show by famed architect Richard Requa and used now as a butterfly sanctuary. The women sometimes wore "ghost panties" and the men had loincloths and shorts on hand. But often, all was discarded.

Season I: The Naked Truth: The Rise and Fall of America's Only Public Nudist Colony in Four Acts
May 22, 2016.  1:00pm - 9:00pm.

Cultural journalist Welton Jones tracked down the elusive details of Zoro Garden and fashioned them into a four-part pageant that came as close as possible to the "truth."  Each 40 minute act occurred at 1:00, 3:00, 5:00 + 7:00 pm.

Season II: The Naked Truth: Free Range
March 18, 2017.  1:00pm - 8:00pm.

After the first season pageant directed by dramatist Playwright Welton Jones, the question still persisted: was Zoro Gardens a social experiment or was it a peepshow? The facts were unclear.

Naked Truth: Free Range revived Zoro Gardens with a group of nudist sympathizers, in collaboration with performance artist Maria Ríos-Mathioudakis.  Hourly programs with special guests explored ways a contemporary reincarnation of a 1935 nudist colony can be an accessible, intersectional, gender non-conforming, and body positive social experiment.

 

 
 
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ORGAN FOR THE SENSES

 

Organ for the Senses at Spreckels Organ

Organ for the Senses is an experimental music concert...

 

Organ for the Senses is an experimental music concert that features newly commissioned electro-acoustic works for the Spreckels Organ, the World’s largest outdoor pipe organ.

Regional and nationally renowned contemporary musicians are commissioned to create new works for Organ for the Senses. Each composition is shaped around the physical properties of the organ itself, giving focus to vibrational qualities of the instrument. Many compositions feature electronic elements, exploring how the organ functions as a massive analogue synthesizer.

Organ for the Senses Season I
June 10, 2016.  8:00pm - 10:00pm.

Each composition explored new ways to not only hear, but to feel and see the vibrations of the Spreckels Organ. During the concert, live projected visualizations allowed visitors to "see" the sound- by live projecting a seismograph registering the physical vibrations of the audio.

Compositions by: Michael Pisaro, Samuel Dunscombe, Sofia Gubaidulina, Steve Flato and Alvin Lucier

Projects by the UCSD Survey of Electronic Music Techniques III course lead by Professor Natacha Diels with: Tahereh Afghah, Wen Liu, Celeste Oram, Johannes Regnier and Felipe Rossi

Organ for the Senses Season II
May 27, 2017.   8:00pm - 10:00pm.

Curated by Alan F Jones (Laminal AudioMarginal Frequency).

Each 10 minute composition explores the physical properties of the organ itself. Vibrationally driven instead of melodically driven works take the stage. Many compositions feature inherent electronic elements, and electronics-as-accompaniment, exploring how the organ functions as a massive analogue synthesizer.

 

Organ for the Senses (Season I, directed by Samuel Dunscombe) vinyl LP available now on Marginal Frequency

 
 

Production
Creative Direction: Kate Clark
Music Direction: Samuel Dunscombe
Organists: Justin Murphy-Mancini Jared C. Jacobsen
Cello: Jessie Marino
Percussion: Sean Dowgray
Organ Curator: Dale Sorensen
Seismograph Design: Curt Miller
Live Projection: Lucas Coffin
Audio Production: Nick Lesley
Concert Recording: Samuel Dunscombe
Stage Video: Camille Laut
ASL interpretation: Billieanne McLellan

Spreckles Support
Max Nanis, Artist + Spreckels Organ Society Board Member
Dr. Carol Williams, San Diego Civic Organist and Spreckels Organ Artistic Director
Dale Sorenson, Spreckels Organ Society Organ Curator
Ross Porter, Spreckels Organ Society Executive Director

Events: 2017
SEASON II










 

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June 10, June 17, June 24, 2017.  12:00pm - 8:00pm.

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border Trolley Tours

Border Trolley Tours Between the Plaza de Panama and The Front in San Ysidro
Despite the fact that the San Diego/Tijuana border is the most transited in the world, only 1 in 4 San Diegans take the drive south to cross.
...

 
 

Despite the fact that the San Diego/Tijuana border is the most transited in the world, only 1 in 4 San Diegans take the drive south to cross. 100 years ago, during the Panama-California Exposition, locals and tourists visiting the Spanish dancers, gem exhibitions, and Native American reenactment villages of Balboa Park often hopped on a trolley and for an “enjoyable 20-mile ride” to “Tia Juana.” Many of the popular restaurants, casinos, and racetracks in Tijuana were funded by the same American dollars that built Balboa Park. Yet in less than a century, the public imagination of fluidity between San Diego to Tijuana has hardened in sync with the concrete border wall itself.

In collaboration with Cog•nate Collective and in partnership with members of Kumeyaay Community College and the teen docent program of Casa Familiar, Parkeology provided a free public tour between Balboa Park and border territories of San Ysidro. Live storytelling and audio recordings traced the humans, animals, and materials that have migrated through the region. Trolley services also provided free round trip visits to Balboa Park for San Ysidro locals.

During tour hours, the Plaza de Panama in Balboa Park was transformed into the Border Trolley Tours interpretive center for tour participants and passerbys.  Cog•nate Collective’s Mobile Institute for Citizenship and Art (MICA) trailer served as the ticket booth and information center. In collaboration with the Velaslavasay Panorama, four mobile peepshow boxes (include link) were displayed in the plaza, providing views of the Tijuana/San Diego border as it has evolved in the past 100 years.

Border Trolley Tours project is in direct support from the Balboa Park Conservancy, The Balboa Park Cultural Partnership, The Project for Public Spaces, Southwest Airlines Heart of the Community Grant & The San Diego Foundation

 
 
 
 
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A Border peepshow


INTERACTIVE SCULPTURE    2017 SAN DIEGO + LOS ANGELES CA + BERLIN, GERMANY
As we move through our cities and towns we often read our world as a fixed moment of time.
...

It is difficult to remember that we are caught in a present began some time ago. Yet, take for example the 8 kilometers of land between San Diego and Tijuana, known today as an international border. Over the past 150 years, its ranches and rivers have been divided and replaced by 3 walls of steel and concrete.

A Border Peepshow provides four views of the political separation of a culturally and ecologically connected terrain. Drawing on historic and contemporary photographs of the region, each box depicts scenes of San Diego/Tijuana from 1887, 1927, 1967, and 2017.

Design of the Border Peepshows references 18th-century parlour toys and the 19th century cameras that first photographed the SD/TJ border. First shown in San Diego and Los Angeles, the Peepshows now travel to other parts of the world to mark borders of the past and present, including the former East/West Berlin Wall.

“A Border Peepshow” is  a collaborative project between Parkeology and The Velaslavasay Panorama. Velaslavasay Panorama is an exhibition hall, theatre and garden dedicated to the production and illumination of unusual visual experiences, including the 360-degree painted panorama.

 

In Collaboration with
Teen Docent Program at the Front:
Hector Castro
Shania Quiambao
Miguel Garcia
Andres Perez
Lourdes Alcala Guerrero
Ana Ortiz
Erick Rincon R.
Christopher Mendiola
Brienneth Durazog

Kumeyaay Community College
Border Peepshows
The Velaslavasay Panorama

Steve Flato, Audio Engineering
Diana Benavidez
Jeszi McPeak
Annie Meitchik
Melissa Magdaleno, Parkeologists

Production + Direction
Parkeology and Cognate Collective

Thanks to
David Flores, Francisco Eme, Senior Park Ranger John Anderson, John Lindsay IV, Erica, Sara Solaimani, Matt Baldwin, Nancy, Anne Marie Tipton, Larry Benegas, Ral Cuero, Bobo Elliott, Lori Ring, members of the Kumeyaay Community College Humanities Course, Marina Grize, Noe Olivas, Rosaura Sánchez, Beatrice Pita

Voices
Nancy Valdivia-Ochoa, Alicia Sanchez, Hector Castro Jr., Anne Marie Tipton,  Lourdes Alcala Guerrero,
Maria Castro Historical and Personal Memories relating to Alta California 1769-1849
by Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo Read by Francisco Eme

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Lives of specimens

 

Lives of Specimens at San Diego Natural History Museum
Children have a common line of questioning when visiting the displays at the NAT. “Is it real? Are they alive?”
...

 
 

Children have a common line of questioning when visiting the displays at the NAT. “Is it real? Are they alive?” Yes, the 7.4 million specimens that exist in theNAT’s research collections are real, and at one point they were alive. A third question arises: “how did you get them?”

After one year of conversations with biologists, zooarchaeologists, paleontologists, entomologists, ornothologists, educators, artists, and exhibit developers, the project Lives of Specimens emerged. Our goal was to create a sculptural installation and storytelling event that connected the dots for the public about the processes plants, animals, and insects undergo before being poised in glass vitrines, submerged in alcohol, or pinned to paper backing by their human stewards.

Hosted as a free event, Lives of Specimens was staged in two parts at the NAT: on the roof and museum atrium. When people entered the museum, they encountered a live video projection of human hands pinning tiny flies, delicate blue birds, and curling ferns. A crowd of 200 people gathered while biologists prepared study specimens, accompanied by a live clarinetist.

In the second part of the evening, the group filtered to the roof of the museum. A sculptural installation of glowing vitrines of mammals and birds ringed the crowd. Projected onto roof walls was a live VJ collage of footage of the museum storage shelves rarely seen by the public. The evening concluded with a live storytelling: a museum artist, an ornithologist, and a paleontologist shared their relationship to working with a biological record that would last far longer than their own bodies.

 
 
 
 

Production
Creative Director: Kate Clark
Creative Advising + Production: Robert Rutherford
Video Installation: Lucas Coffin
Video assistants: Doug Hammen, Farshid Bazmandegan
Vitrine Design + Fabrication: Per Kefgen
Video: Ren Ebel, Kate Clark

Performers
Judy Carlstrom: preparator
Dr. Michael Wall: preparator
Maria Gonzalez Ceron: preparator
Michiko Ogawa: sho, clarinet, electronics
Judith Hamann: cello
Jim Melli: storyteller
Suzanne Hoyem: storyteller
Robert Rutherford: storyteller

San Diego Art Institute Support
Nick Lesley
Marina Grize
Lissa Corona

 

Parkeologists
Erik Trayvon Benson
Minxuan Lin
Jeszi Mcpeak
Louise Hickman
Abra Olivier
Elizabeth Sutton
TheNAT Support:
Michael Field
Dr. Michael Wall
Suzanne Hoyem
Robert Rutherford
Susan Arter
Dr. Tom Demere
Lauren Marino
Dr. Philip Unitt
Layla Aerne Hains
Bradley Tsalyuk
April Tellez
Judy Gradwohl
Judy Carlstrom
Beth Redmond-Jones
Dr. Bradford Hollingsworth


Rebecca Handelsman
Dr. Jon Rebman
Christopher Plouffe
Jim Berrian
Judy Carlstrom
Katie Amarillas
Alexis McKee
Project Wildlife Support:
Aireo Shipman
Linda King
Justine Matthews
Maria Gonzalez Ceron
Frederick Addesso


Thanks to
Joe Yorty
USD Department of Art and Architecture
Samuel Dunscombe
Susan Myrland
School for Creative Careers
Save Starlight

January 27th, 2017.  6:30pm - 8:30pm.

Time capsule ceremony

In the past 100 years, dozens of organizations in Balboa Park have inaugurated their groundbreakings, anniversaries, and office parties through stuffing objects in containers for future publics.
...

 
 

In the past 100 years, dozens of organizations in Balboa Park have inaugurated their groundbreakings, anniversaries, and office parties through stuffing objects in containers for future publics. Yet, the most common response associated with opening these vessels is disappointment, time capsule expert Nicholas Yablon tells us. What does this dual relationship of memorializing and disappointment say about our culture? To ring in Parkeology Season II, we explored our urge to commemorate in response to the inevitable march of time.

Perhaps time capsules would have more value if opened by generations closer to their creators. Following this theory,we unveiled a 1999 time capsule from the Y2K era of the San Diego Park and Recreation Administration. Park RangerKim Duclo officiated the unsealing, accompanied by the San Diego High School Drumline. Time Capsule expert Nicholas Yablon provided insight into the affair. The evening concluded with an open forum anti-time capsule campfire.

 
 
 
 

Production
Officiated by Park Ranger Kim Duclo
Produced by Kate Clark
Drumline performance by San Diego High School Drumline
Guest Speaker: Nicholas Yablon
Production Assistance: Peter Chen, Diana Benavidez, Tamara Williams, Jeremy Raab, Tamara Williams, Daniel Leinad, Per Kefgen
Concept Development: Marina Grize
A/V: Steve Stopper, Glenna Trone (Save Starlight)
Projection Installation Advising: Stefani Byrd
Video: Ren Ebel
Photography: Rafa Rios
Research: Darlene Davies, Kim Duclo
Brochure Design: Dylan Wilde
Map Drawing: Kate Clark
Anti-Time Capsule: Diana Benavidez

 

San Diego Art Institute Support
Marina Grize
Andrew Utt
Lissa Corona
Nick Lesley

Thank you to
Senior Park Ranger Jon Anderson
Bruce Martinez
Mario Llanos

Events: 2016
SEASON I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 24 - August 14th 2016

Parkeology: In Dust We Trust

Retrospective Exhibition


Parkeology: In Dust We Trust was a retrospective exhibition at The San Diego Art Institute, featuring Season I of Parkeology events in Balboa Park.

 

Parkeology: In Dust We Trust was a retrospective exhibition at The San Diego Art Institute, featuring Season I of Parkeology events in Balboa Park.

True to our motto, each of the Parkeology projects began through sifting through boxes, snooping in basements, and following up on another kind of dirt: gossip. Over time, these fragments grew into the five exhibited collaborative events and their respective costumes, objects, and documents.

These five Parkeology projects are only a handful of shards in the kaleidoscope of activity that occurs amidst the 1,400 acres of developed land in Balboa Park. Accompanying park relics featured in the exhibition were also displayed, carrying their own complex histories yet to be excavated.

 

facing artifacts


Facing Artifacts: Casting, Collecting and Profiling at the San Diego Museum of Man
Collecting humans as specimens has a long history in anthropology.
...

 
 

Collecting humans as specimens has a long history in anthropology. In 1915, the Museum of Man worked with the Smithsonian Institution to acquire life casts of members of Native American nations, as well as many other groups of color for anthropological research about racial variation and evolution. These casts were exhibited to the San Diego public for the Panama California Exposition.

Revisiting this troubled history, Parkeology invited the public to donate their faces to the collections of the Museum of Man. Facing Artifacts participants witnessed first hand what it’s like to have the most intimate part of themselves transform into a museum artifact.

For one day, a life casting station was headquartered in the museum rotunda. Selected by a randomized lottery process, visitors sat for 30 minutes with a Parkeology face casting technician. Their faces were molded, cast in plaster, and immediately registered as a loan by Museum of Man collections managers. These new artifacts were documented and exhibited in the Museum of Man alongside their 1915 predecessors.

 
 
 
 

Production
Face Casting Technicians: Jerry Blackman, Kate Clark
Face Casting Assistants: Diana E. Benavidez, Jeremy Raab
Face Casting Support: Daniel Hathaway
Museum Interpreter and Press Contact: Elizabeth Sutton,  Jessica McPeak
Reception: Peter Chen and Ashley Moy
Portrait Documentarian: Camille Laut
Harpist: Meghan Elizabeth Orr
Stills Documentation: Clark Bledsoe
Project Liaison and Reception: Alena Vasquez
Channel Parkeology Guest: Gwyn Isaac, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History Curator
Channel Parkeology Video, Editing, Direction: Ren Ebel
ParkCast: Sound, Editing and Direction: Parker Bray

Face Casting Models
Jan Wallden
Dianne Berg
Catherine Cheng
Anthony A. Labue
Captain Burnett
Carter Lee Burnett
Jessica Kohley
Mary Jeong
Carina Novik
Philip E. Church
Nikki Nee
Megan Adcock
Marilyn Rudoff
Melissa Lynn Haeffner
Gordon L. Permann II
Margaret Williams
Gwyneira Isaac
Samantha Alberts
Katty Ibarra

Museum of Man Staff support
Karen Lacy, Collections Manager
Emily Anderson, Director of Exhibit Development
Audrey Chang, Project Director
Kelly Williams, Director of Collections
Sarah Crawford, Exhibit Developer
Kara Vetter, Registrar
Jason Porter, Director of Education and Public Engagement
Yadira Jaramillo, MoM Custodial Staff
Consuelo Hernandez, MoM Custodial Staff

 
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untracked


Untracked at the San Diego Model Railroad Museum
Below the button controlled coal trains, hand driven railroad ties, and 1/87th scale cacti, lies a complex universe in the San Diego Model Railroad Museum.
...

 
 

Below the button controlled coal trains, hand driven railroad ties, and 1/87th scale cacti, lies a complex universe in the San Diego Model Railroad Museum. Untracked explored the subterranean dispatch offices, chicken wire substrates, and networked control panels that supports railway operations of the San Diego Miniature Model Railroad Museum.

Intimate tours of four were lead by an elected guide of the four model railroad clubs:  The San Diego Model Railroad Association, The La Mesa Model Railroad Club, The San Diego Society of N-Scale, and The San Diego 3-Railers. Visitors experienced how each individually organized club builds and operates their landscapes and railways under a unique order of esthetics, scale, and culture.

Following precise timed railway operation methods, tour groups rotated through each landscape model. Each tour lasted 1 hour.

 
 
 
 

Production
Channel Parkeology Video, Editing, Direction: Ren Ebel
ParkCast: Sound, Editing and Direction: Parker Bray
Stills Documentation: Camille Laut, Clark Bledsoe
Sound Assistance: Sierra Waller and Perry Platypus
Operations /Front Table: Marina Grize, Alena Vasquez

Thanks to:
Beth Holmberg, Kim Duclo and Carina Weber

San Diego Model Railroad Museum Contributing Clubs
San Diego Model Railroad Association
La Mesa Model Railroad Club
San Diego Society of N-Scale
San Diego 3-Railers

Tour Guides
Jon Everett
Hans Paar
Michael Thornhill
Bruce Cameron

Parkeology Conductors
Peter Chen
Jessica McPeak
Diana E Benavidez
Gabrielle Ramlow
Ashley Moy
Elizabeth Sutton
Kate Clark